Old Williamson County Jail

312 Main Street

circa 1888. The lawlessness of the frontier days prompted county fathers to commission this imposing fortress-like jail, the county’s fourth. The limestone building with crenelated parapet was designed by prominent Waco architects, Dodson and Dudley, in a style reminiscent of the French Bastille. This historic building no longer serves as a jail, but has become a landmark, housing offices in downtown Georgetown.

 

Old U.S. Post Office

circa 1931. Buff-colored brick offset with terra cotta and marble trim was used to construct the Georgetown Revival-style post office, the only example of this architectural style in Georgetown. The dormer windows, roofline balustrade, classical pilasters, round keystone arched windows, and handsome broken scroll pediment over the entrance are typical Georgetown Revival details. In 1895, a frame structure on this site housed a livery stable and undertaker.

113 E. 8th Street

Masonic Lodge

circa 1900. With an onion dome spire soaring majestically from the corner tower, the Lodge became a major element in Georgetown’s streetscape and skyline. The Belford Lumber Company selected heavily resticated limestone with which to construct the building, which features arched door and window openings. The ground floor first housed a drugstore and, for a time, the post office before a furniture store took possession. The Masons continued to meet upstairs until 1982 when the building was sold.

701 Main Street

M.B. Lockett Building

circa 1885. M.B. Lockett’s prominence as a successful dry goods merchant is reflected in this impressive limestone and brick building, which was remodeled in 1896. One of Georgetown’s most outstanding examples of High Victorian commercial architecture, it features Mesker Brothers cast iron columns, an oriel windows and decorative pressed metal cornice.

119 W. 7th Street

H. C. Craig Building

circa 1903. This pressed metal storefront is one of the nearly 5,000 sold by the St. Louis firm of Mesker Brothers between 1884 and 1907. Marketed by catalog and shipped by rail, these metal fronts offered affordable yet stylish alternatives for the “public” facades of buildings. H.C. Craig Furniture store opened in this building in 1903.

115 W. 7th Street

C.A.D Clamp Buildings

Departing from the local tradition of limestone, these buildings feature imported brick facades accented by cast iron columns attributed to F. Heireman, an Austin metalwork company. Originally each featured identical metal hood molds over the windows and crowning metal cornices. A stepped brick parapet later replaced the cornice on 709 Main. Both buildings are owned by the Williamson County Sun which has published from this located since 1934.

707-709 Main Street

101 W. 7th Street

circa 1885.  An early limestone structure with carved cornices stands beneath the modern stucco facade. Early uses of the building included a local lodge meeting hall on the second floor, and a hardware/grocery store and later, the county’s oldest newspaper, the Williamson County Sun, on the first floor. Now city owned, it houses the Georgetown History and Visitor Information Center.

101 W. 7th Street

Founder’s Park

811 Main Street
(512) 930-3595

Williamson County’s first six commissioners met here under a stately oak tree in May 1848 to choose a location for the county seat. George Washington Glasscock offered to donate the land he owned jointly with Thomas B. Huling as a site for the county seat. The land was bounded by the oak tree at one corner and the San Gabriel River to the north and west. The commissioners named the town Georgetown in Glasscock’s honor.